D1: Making Compound Words

Combine two one-syllable words to make a new word: a compound word.

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D2: Making A Longer Word

Blend a one-syllable word and a two-syllable word into a longer compound word.

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D3: Compound Words, Part 1

Hear a two-syllable compound word and identify the first syllable, using picture cards as visual clues.

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D4: Compound Words, Part 2

Hear a two-syllable compound word and identify the first syllable, but with no picture clues.

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D5: Compound Words, Part 3

Hear a two-syllable compound word and identify the second syllable, using picture cards as visual clues.

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D6: Compound Words, Part 4

Hear a two-syllable compound word and identify the second syllable, but with no picture clues.

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D7: Compound Words, Part 5

Hear a two-syllable compound word and identify either the first or second syllable, using picture cards as visual clues.

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D8: Compound Words, Part 6

Hear a two-syllable compound word and identify either the first or second syllable, but with no picture clues.

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1. Overview

Your child now understands that spoken language can be broken down into sentences and words. The next step is learning how to divide words into syllables, and then the child will be ready to divide words into individual sounds, or phonemes.

But syllables are a difficult concept for young children. An individual syllable, like the cy part of fancy, might have no meaning on its own, so your child has never noticed it before. For that reason, we ease into the concept of syllables with a series of games using compound words.

Compound words are multi-syllable words that are made up of smaller words, such as rainbow, skateboard, and birdhouse. Because each syllable of a two-syllable compound word is a word on its own, children are better able to notice them and to understand what you mean when you talk about dividing a word into parts (syllables).

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2. Compound Word Activities

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